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7 Moving Tips to Settle Into Your New Home

August 27, 2015 |  Article By :   | 

7 Moving Tips to Settle Into Your New Home

Moving to a new community and home, whether it’s 1,000 miles away or just across town; involves a lot of planning and attention to detail. Much attention goes into getting moved out, but getting moved in is just as important. Here are 7 moving tips to settle into your new home:

No Clutter1: Unpack the essentials

With a little planning you can create an “open first” box that will have your essentials for the first few days. If you’re not moving everything yourself, plan for the possibility of arriving before your stuff does. Toiletries, medicine, a few changes of clothes, and basic kitchen items (such as a can opener, wooden spoon, cutting knife, one pot and one pan) are good examples of must-have items.

2: Help your pets acclimate

A move can leave pets excited and scared. If possible, do not leave them unattended in the yard. Staying in their presence will be calming and lessens the chance of runaways.

3: Get the kids settled

If your things have arrived, help each child set up their bed and unpack one box of toys. Otherwise, get them excited about “camping” in their new home. Make sure you have a bag with their few favorite toys, or for teens and pre-teens, some electronics and books or magazines.

4: Go to the grocery store

Consider eating out the first night, and buy essential groceries on the way home. Focus on easy-to-make foods and quick snack items. Buy any cleaning supplies that you need. If you have a pet, buy any food and supplies not already in your “essentials” box.

5: Cover the windows

If your home doesn’t yet have window coverings, hang sheets up to add privacy and security.

6: Set a finish linechecklist

Make a list specifying the order in which you will unpack and complete other moving-in tasks. Creating a list will help keep you from feeling overwhelmed.

7: Get the lay of the land

Walk through your new home to check the heating, air conditioning, and electricity, as well as all appliances. Take your family on a walk through the neighborhood to learn your surroundings, and if possible meet your neighbors.

Ready?

This is by no means everything you need to know about getting settled, but it’s a good place to start. Do you need to find a good plumber, a carpet layer, a painter and so on? Take a look at Wendy’s Resource List on wendycarson.com for her recommendations!

Reality TV Comes to Minnesota

April 21, 2014 |  Article By : 

myfirsthome_badge_160x120Have you ever wondered what it is like to be in a reality TV show?  My clients, Kyle and Tasha Johnson and sister Shayna Simmons and I had that opportunity on the cable television network TLC’s show My First Home!  This 30-minute show follows potential home buyers through the emotional highs and lows of trying to buy their first home.  What was the experience like?   In the TV and movie business you really do hurry up and wait while the crew sets up the cameras and lights.  The “stars” are responsible for several changes of clothes during filming every day.  The episode called “Three’s A Crowd?” will be broadcast May 3rd at 12:30 p.m. Pacific time on TLC.  Tune in to find out more about the show, contact me for more answers to your questions, watch a sneak peek at goo.gl/uHhyby, or better yet attend the Minnesota premier of the event on May 10th.  Contact me for event information.

Moving and Storage on the Cheap

April 8, 2014 |  Article By : 

Think cheap moving involve bribery with pizza and beer? You’re not alone. Amy Stafford used this formula for several apartment moves off-campus during college and early in her working career. Only when Amy’s inexpensive “freelance” movers “accidentally” kept several boxes of her stuff — and disappeared — did Amy realize she didn’t know the first thing about moving safely on movng boxesthe cheap.

We’ve talked with experts to find out the best tips for moving safely — and cheaply. If only Amy had known.

Cheap Moving: Plan Ahead
A last-minute move will cost you in more ways than one. Start your planning as early as possible to reduce costs and headaches. With advance notice, you’ll have a better chance of enlisting the free-to-cheap assistance of family and friends, as well as time to source free moving items (such as boxes) from your local store. Planning your move in advance also gives you time to sell unnecessary items. Selling items can raise additional funds to cover moving costs.

Reduce, Reduce, Reduce
Before any move, carefully evaluate all of your possessions to determine which items must go with you and which items can be put in storage, sold or, even better, donated to others. This task may seem monumental until you consider the fiscal benefits of reducing the items that you’re moving. Keep in mind that fewer items means less to box (saving you time), less to transport (saving you fuel), and less to manage (saving your sanity). Donate excess items to civic or charitable organizations, or friends and family. Don’t fill the landfill with usable items.

Move Yourself or Pay Wisely
The cheapest way to move anywhere is to move yourself. Hands down it is the most cost-effective if you aren’t moving large furniture. Moving yourself is not less expensive if you’ll spend more time than necessary carting things up and down stairs (especially if you’ll miss work to do it). If you value your time, hire help.

Hiring movers or Man With a Van-type hired brawn can be cost effective. While friends and family might accept beer and pizza as payment, most movers — even independent ones — will request cold, hard cash.  But get recommendations to avoid movers who help themselves to your possessions with a five-finger discount. Determine costs up-front, but pay after your items are moved. Tip generously.

Moving and Storage
Self-moving, or ‘container moving’ is a growing trend.  You rent a container  (pod) and fill it yourself or hire labor to fill it.  A company then moves the container for you. You can unload it yourself or hire help on the other end.  A container move can happen locally or interstate.  Using a pod or container can save between 30 to 40 percent compared to the cost of traditional moving vans and movers. It may also be the best of both worlds when it comes to economy versus hired movers.

Rent the Smallest Moving Van
Aren’t ready to use a container? Reserve the smallest moving van early because the smaller, and cheaper, moving vans tend to be booked first. If you are unsure about the size you’ll need, estimate it by the number of rooms (kitchen, living room, bedrooms) of stuff that you’ll be moving. Moving companies have size estimates that are quite helpful.

Trade Services
If you need help moving, another way to reduce costs is to trade skills or services. If you have a friend or family member willing to help you move, you can trade your professional know-how or other skill in return. Write up a simple agreement that outlines what you’ll offer in exchange for moving help. Be sure to include the time frame for delivery and what constitutes a finished project — to ensure that both parties are happy with the arrangement and consider it a fair trade. You may find that the skills you use every day might also help you pay for your move.
When it comes to moving on the cheap, weigh your options carefully. A complete do-it-yourself move can save money but cost valuable time. Movers can be extremely helpful, or, as Amy discovered the hard way, thieves in disguise. If you hire movers, pay for professionals and get references. Consider “container moving” as a method that gives you the best budget-friendly options while also using the services of professionals.

 

By Katie McCaskey, AOL Real Estate

 

Preparing to Move

September 20, 2013 |  Article By :   | 

9150721_sYou are buying a home and/or have sold your home. Now it is time to prepare for the move. What are some things you need to keep in mind? This is just a partial list, but these are important items to ensure a smooth move. Two months may seem like plenty of time, but if you don’t start early, the time will pass by quickly and before you know it moving day will arrive.

One to two months out:

  • Line up a moving company or moving truck
  • If you need storage, find and reserve a storage facility
  • Start sorting your stuff – maybe hold a garage sale or donate items to charity
  • If you are moving yourself, start looking for boxes
  • Start eating the grocery items you have on hand so you will have less to move or toss out

One month or less to move:

  • Fill out address change form with the post office
  • Arrange for new insurance and to transfer current policies
  • Start packing items you won’t be needing before the move
  • Set up final utility readings and set up new accounts for your new home